Academic-career and Ph.D. grant recipients share roads to success and future plans

Nancy Profera

January 23, 2023

The SME Academic Career Development Grant and Ph.D. Fellowship Grant programs were established in 2015 by the SME Board of Directors. The programs are designed to provide grants to assist new faculty to achieve tenure and promotion, and as graduate fellowships for Ph.D. students who are committed to pursuing academic careers in the mining and minerals field.

The 2022 recipients are Angelina Anani, associate professor with the Department of Mining and Geological Engineering at the University of Arizona and Taghi Sherizadeh from Missouri University of Science and Technology. Three candidates are awarded the 2022 Shoemaker Ph.D. Fellowship Grant: Lynette Hutson of the University of Arizona, Amy McBrayer of South Dakota School of Mines and Elham Rahimi of Pennsylvania State University.

The following are excerpts from interviews Mining Engineering (ME) conducted with the grant recipients. You can read the full profiles of each recipient in the February 2023 issue of Mining Engineering magazine.

Angelina Anani
University of Arizona, 2022 Freeport-McMoRan, Inc. Career Development Grant

ME: How has the grant helped your career?
Anani: It will support activities such as research, publications, teaching and professional service — all necessary to achieve tenure and promotion.

Taghi Sherizadeh
Missouri University of Science & Technology, 2022 Freeport-McMoRan, Inc. Career Development Grant

ME: What drew you to the field of mining? What kind of work do you do and hope to do in the future?
Sherizadeh: My hometown has many views of exposed rock and mountains in the distance, and I have many memories from an early age of examining rock outcrops in the fields there. I have always found mining and tunneling fascinating, and as an adventure to further explore new rocks and new places that no one has ever seen before.

Lynnette Leila Hutson
University of Arizona, 2022 Shoemaker Ph.D. Fellowship Grant

ME: What drew you to the field of mining? What kind of work do you do and hope to do in the future?
Hutson: I initially started working in the industry after pursuing a master’s of geoscience degree at the University of Arizona. It was the start of a mining super cycle and a great time to enter the industry because there were so many job opportunities. I knew just enough about economic geology to know it was a really interesting subfield of geology.

Amy McBrayer
South Dakota School of Mines, 2022 Stantec/McIntosh Ph.D. Fellowship Grant

ME: What drew you to the field of mining? What kind of work do you do and hope to do in future?
McBrayer: I was drawn to mining in high school after completing a report on the field of mining engineering. I was attracted by the diverse opportunities for mining engineers in the United States and abroad. I initially was interested in reclamation and remediation but found a passion for mine design and planning, as well as operations management, through internships during my undergraduate years.

Elham Rahimi
Pennsylvania State University, 2022 SME Ph.D. Fellowship Grant

ME: What drew you to the field of mining? What kind of work do you do and hope to do in future?
Rahimi: I believe mining is one of the most fascinating and dynamic majors that embraces new technologies. I was inspired to study mining engineering when I had a geology class in high school, which helped me to understand the role of minerals in industries and downstream. I decided to play a role in this field and my desire to become an innovative researcher as well as a model in education led me to the point where I could do research on a broad spectrum of challenges in the mining industry.

To download guidelines for the SME Academic Career Development Grant and Ph.D. Fellowship Grant programs and for more information, visit www.smenet.org/Professional-Development/Academic-Career-Development-Program or www.smenet.org/Professional-Development/PhD-Fellowship-Program.

 

 

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