ME home
 
  SME FaceBook SME Twitter SME LinkedIn RSS Feed

Subscriber or
SME Member Log On

WEB-ONLY CONTENT

Go to SME eNEWS

MINING INDUSTRY EVENTS

Copper 2019  - Conference
Aug 18, 2019 - Aug 21, 2019
AIMEX  - Exhibit
Aug 27, 2019 - Aug 29, 2019
6th Internatl Congress on Environment and Soc Resp  - Conference
Sep 4, 2019 - Sep 6, 2019
Future of Mining EMEA 2019  - Conference
Sep 4, 2019 - Sep 5, 2019

METAL PRICES


Au
Ag
Pt
Pd
Ni
Cu
Al
Pb

AGGREGATES
AND MINERALS
MARKETPLACE


http://aggregatesmineralsmarketplace.com
The Mining Engineering, SME and NSSGA
Online Buyers Directory Site
The Online Global Mining and Minerals Library Site
August 2019
Volume 71    Issue 8

Associations between whole-body vibration exposure and occupational and personal factors in drill operators in Indian iron ore mines

Mining Engineering, 2019, Vol. 71, No. 8, pp. 62-63
Chaudhary, Dhanjee Kumar; Bhattacherjee, Ashis; Patra, Aditya Kumar; Upadhyay, Rahul; Chau, Nearkasen


ABSTRACT:

Heavy earth-moving machineries used in openpit mines intensively expose drill operators to whole-body vibration and shocks, and thus to musculoskeletal disorders. The roles of individual, machine and rock-related factors in their exposure remain poorly understood. This cross-sectional study investigated their roles in 39 drill operators from Indian iron ore mines. It shows that 70 percent of the operators were exposed to high levels of vibration, above the limit values recommended by ISO 2631-1 (1997). Multiple linear regression models showed that the whole-body vibration and shock exposures were strongly associated with operator’s age, drill-machine model and rock hardness, uniaxial compressive strength and density. The role of body mass index was close to significance (p = 0.08). Univariate analyses found the drill’s age, seat-pad thickness and seat backrest height were also strong predictors. These results help in identifying risky operators, materials and occupational situations, and in implementing appropriate prevention and intervention strategies to reduce and monitor the exposures and health risk. In addition, during the planning stage of acquisition of new equipment, anthropometric data of the operators should be considered for the ergonomic design of the seat.



Please login to access this article.

OR

If you are not an SME member, you can join SME by clicking the button below.