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June 1999
Volume 51    Issue 6

Integrated approach for predicting mining subsidence in hilly terrain

Mining Engineering, 1999, Vol. 51, No. 6, pp. 0-5
Luo, Y.; Peng, S.S.


ABSTRACT:

Field studies in mining subsidence have shown that steep and complicated surface terrain can strongly affect the surface movement (particularly the horizontal displacement) caused by underground mining activities. This type of phenomena is often referred to as a surface topographical effect on subsidence. For underground mining operations employing high extraction methods (i.e., longwall and retreat room and pillar), the current technologies can predict surface subsidence to a fairly good accuracy when surface topography is flat or moderate. As the surface topography gets steeper and more complicated, the predicted movement, especially its horizontal component without considering the surface topographical effect, becomes less reliable. To improve the accuracy of subsidence prediction in the hilly regions, a mathematical model was proposed by the authors (Luo, 1989; Luo and Peng, 1990). This model performs well in some cases, while it produces unsatisfactory results in other occasions, although varying degrees of improvement can still be made when the topographical effect is taken into account. One of the reasons for such an inconsistency in the performance of this model is that the tentative method for determining one parameter, the proportionality coefficient (introduced in this model), is incapable of considering the largely varying slope geometry and soil properties.  



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